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We Regret to Inform You

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Mischa Abramavicius is a walking, talking, top-scoring, perfectly well-rounded college application in human form. So when she's rejected not only by the Ivies, but her loathsome safety school, she is shocked and devastated. All the sacrifices her mother made to send her to prep school, the late nights cramming for tests, the blatantly resume-padding extracurriculars (read: Mischa Abramavicius is a walking, talking, top-scoring, perfectly well-rounded college application in human form. So when she's rejected not only by the Ivies, but her loathsome safety school, she is shocked and devastated. All the sacrifices her mother made to send her to prep school, the late nights cramming for tests, the blatantly resume-padding extracurriculars (read: Students for Sober Driving) ... all that for nothing. As Mischa grapples with the prospect of an increasingly uncertain future, she questions how this could have happened in the first place. Is it possible that her transcript was hacked? With the help of her best friend and sometimes crush, Nate, and a group of eccentric techies known as "The Ophelia Syndicate," Mischa launches an investigation that will shake the quiet community of Blanchard Prep to its stately brick foundations.


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Mischa Abramavicius is a walking, talking, top-scoring, perfectly well-rounded college application in human form. So when she's rejected not only by the Ivies, but her loathsome safety school, she is shocked and devastated. All the sacrifices her mother made to send her to prep school, the late nights cramming for tests, the blatantly resume-padding extracurriculars (read: Mischa Abramavicius is a walking, talking, top-scoring, perfectly well-rounded college application in human form. So when she's rejected not only by the Ivies, but her loathsome safety school, she is shocked and devastated. All the sacrifices her mother made to send her to prep school, the late nights cramming for tests, the blatantly resume-padding extracurriculars (read: Students for Sober Driving) ... all that for nothing. As Mischa grapples with the prospect of an increasingly uncertain future, she questions how this could have happened in the first place. Is it possible that her transcript was hacked? With the help of her best friend and sometimes crush, Nate, and a group of eccentric techies known as "The Ophelia Syndicate," Mischa launches an investigation that will shake the quiet community of Blanchard Prep to its stately brick foundations.

30 review for We Regret to Inform You

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    3.5 stars A rare YA novel that approaches overachieving and the relentless hunt for the “best school” in a moderately interesting way. (It really is amazing, although not surprising, how far some families would go to get into the so much coveted Ivy League schools.) But the characters are thinner than I prefer and often interchangeable. The mystery only exists because adults are oblivious/don’t do their jobs, as it always is in YA.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jen Ryland

    Cute - intrigue surrounding college admissions. A promising senior at a private high school is rejected from every school she applies to and discovers that something strange happened to her transcript. No one is above suspicion! A nice balance of suspense, humor, family and romance. Had a bit of a Veronica Mars vibe, which I liked! Read more of my reviews on JenRyland.com! Check out my Bookstagram! Or check out my Jen In Ten reviews on Youtube - get the lowdown on current books in 10-30 seconds!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    Rating: 4.5 Stars This was the moment, when it was all supposed to payoff. This was the reward for all her hard work, sleepless nights and her mother's financial sacrifice so that she could attend a top notch private high school. High SAT scores - check! Near perfect GPA (curse you freshman PE!) - check! A long list of leadership and club positions - check! Mischa was a dream on paper, but as everyone began celebrating their college acceptances, she received NONE. This book was one of my anticipat Rating: 4.5 Stars This was the moment, when it was all supposed to payoff. This was the reward for all her hard work, sleepless nights and her mother's financial sacrifice so that she could attend a top notch private high school. High SAT scores - check! Near perfect GPA (curse you freshman PE!) - check! A long list of leadership and club positions - check! Mischa was a dream on paper, but as everyone began celebrating their college acceptances, she received NONE. This book was one of my anticipated reads for 2018, and it did not let me down. I throughly enjoyed Kaplan's debut, Grendel's Guide to Love and War, and therefore expected a story full or humor and heart. Not only did Kaplan deliver an often hilarious tale of senior year woe, but she also really took a hard look at the weight of expectations and the pressures that most high school students face. Many times, overachievers are portrayed as a little bit cutthroat, but that was not the case with Mischa. When we first met her, she was secure and confident in her abilities. Yes, she was over extended to some degree, but she had a great sense of humor and a friendly demeanor. I had no problem liking her, and when things took a turn for the worst, I had no problem sharing her pain. Mischa was lucky to have a stupendous best friend in Nate. He always seemed to have time for Mischa or made time for her. I loved the ease of their friendship and the support he gave to her. Nate was a lot more complex, than I originally anticipated, and I thought his backstory, which was slowly revealed, was an important part of Mischa's journey. And that brings me to the part I always appreciate in YA books, the main character's journey of self discovery. Mischa's whole life plan sort of went up in smoke. Without the Ivy League acceptance letter in her hand, she had no idea who she was or what she could be. It was sort of sad to think, that people see themselves as grades and scores, but most of us were once there or ARE there, and could therefore, totally relate to Mischa's identity crisis. I thought that was all this book was going to be about, but after all the rejections were received, a mystery began to unfold, the mystery of who sabotaged Mischa's college admissions. The whole Scooby thing with the Ophelia Syndicate was a lot of fun. How could I not love a sassy trio of stem loving girls. In addition to helping Mischa uncover the truth about her admissions failures, they also helped her see beyond "Mischa the Overachiever" and see Mischa the person. The mystery was filled with all the delicious drama that I was expecting. It also contained plenty of social commentary, and I liked the way multiple characters added to the exploration of "what comes next". It always bothered me, that college is made to seem like the only after high school option, and it was refreshing to see other options mentioned. Overall: This was a wonderful mixture of comedy, drama, and mystery with a touch of romance, that thoughtfully explored many of the pressures associated with the standard ideas of achievement. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    We Regret to Inform You is a piece of YA fiction that is a perfect hybrid of mystery and drama with a bit of romance. Misha takes some hits and questions herself, but ultimately, she escapes rock bottom with the help of her wit and determination. What starts as drama quickly turns to a satisfying caper that twists and turns to great conclusion. I would definitely recommend this one. Thank you to NetGalley, Random House Children’s Books, Alfred A Knopf for Young Readers, and A.E. Kaplan for the ad We Regret to Inform You is a piece of YA fiction that is a perfect hybrid of mystery and drama with a bit of romance. Misha takes some hits and questions herself, but ultimately, she escapes rock bottom with the help of her wit and determination. What starts as drama quickly turns to a satisfying caper that twists and turns to great conclusion. I would definitely recommend this one. Thank you to NetGalley, Random House Children’s Books, Alfred A Knopf for Young Readers, and A.E. Kaplan for the advanced copy for review. Full review can be found here: https://paulspicks.blog/2018/05/04/we... Please check out all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dahlia

    Oh man I enjoyed that a lot. It was only partly what I expected; I kind of thought the MC would have more of an Enter Title Here vibe. But she didn't, and I loved her for it. (Not a criticism of ETH - I love that MC - but I feel like it's the obvious voice for an overachiever and it's nice to see an alternative.) Also, the secondary characters are fabulous, especially Nate, whom I utterly adored. Woof I shipped them hard. ETA: I forgot to mention when I first reviewed, but also, I loved the littl Oh man I enjoyed that a lot. It was only partly what I expected; I kind of thought the MC would have more of an Enter Title Here vibe. But she didn't, and I loved her for it. (Not a criticism of ETH - I love that MC - but I feel like it's the obvious voice for an overachiever and it's nice to see an alternative.) Also, the secondary characters are fabulous, especially Nate, whom I utterly adored. Woof I shipped them hard. ETA: I forgot to mention when I first reviewed, but also, I loved the little bits about her family history (especially as someone who has familial roots in the Holocaust), straddling the privilege line, and feeling the pressure to make more of life. Yes, that's a lot of things that resonated really hard that I initially forgot to mention because I was distracted by my love of the characters and ship. So sue me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lorilin

    Mischa Abramavicius is a straight-A student at a top private high school. The fact that she's there on scholarship has only motivated her to work her hardest, and it shows. She's consistently at the top of her class with good grades and impressive extracurricular achievements. When the time comes to hear which colleges she made it into, Mischa is anxious but still confident that the acceptance letters will come rolling in. So she is absolutely devastated when she gets into...zero schools, not ev Mischa Abramavicius is a straight-A student at a top private high school. The fact that she's there on scholarship has only motivated her to work her hardest, and it shows. She's consistently at the top of her class with good grades and impressive extracurricular achievements. When the time comes to hear which colleges she made it into, Mischa is anxious but still confident that the acceptance letters will come rolling in. So she is absolutely devastated when she gets into...zero schools, not even her safety. Of course, Mischa is humiliated. But as time goes by, she wonders what went wrong and, ultimately, concludes that the facts just don't add up. With help from her best friend, Nate, as well as a quirky group of girls in the technology club at her school, Mischa follows the trail of her admissions paperwork and uncovers some shocking truths.  *   *   *   *   * This book wasn't at all what I was expecting it to be. I actually thought it was going to be about Mischa getting completely rejected from colleges and then having to, like, find a job and struggle to redefine her life. Ooooops. Not even close. In reality, We Regret to Inform You is basically a young adult mystery. There's a good story in there, but it's mostly a whodunnit. And it's great! The book is light and fun, quirky and entertaining, with lots of clever banter between characters. It never gets too deep or layered, but it works. This is a perfect feel-good read when you want something engaging but not too heavy. It's not the type of book I'd normally pick up, but I surprised myself by really enjoying it. Thanks to Alfred A Knopf and Amazon Vine for the ARC! See more of my reviews at www.bugbugbooks.com!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    Read my full review here! Some of the writing in this book is really bad. This next line comes directly from the book."It was good. It tasted maple-y. I like maple." That drove me insane and pulled away from the interesting plot. I felt like this book took a completely different turn, I was not expecting (view spoiler)[it was going to be that she was hacked. I thought it was dealing with being turned down by colleges. (hide spoiler)] Once the plot in the book got going it was interesting and it kep Read my full review here! Some of the writing in this book is really bad. This next line comes directly from the book."It was good. It tasted maple-y. I like maple." That drove me insane and pulled away from the interesting plot. I felt like this book took a completely different turn, I was not expecting (view spoiler)[it was going to be that she was hacked. I thought it was dealing with being turned down by colleges. (hide spoiler)] Once the plot in the book got going it was interesting and it kept me invested. I just wish the writing was better.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    We Regret To Inform You was a book I was eagerly anticipating, because I had this feeling. You know, the one you have for a book you know you’ll enjoy. I’m really happy to say that, I was right. Sweet, fun, entertaining, We Regret To Inform You was, for me, a bingeable kind of read. With the main topic of it being about a teenager not getting into the college of her choice, it really emphasized the process of getting into college at all in the United States. Being French, I never had to go throug We Regret To Inform You was a book I was eagerly anticipating, because I had this feeling. You know, the one you have for a book you know you’ll enjoy. I’m really happy to say that, I was right. Sweet, fun, entertaining, We Regret To Inform You was, for me, a bingeable kind of read. With the main topic of it being about a teenager not getting into the college of her choice, it really emphasized the process of getting into college at all in the United States. Being French, I never had to go through this stressful, complicated process with university applications (it is very different here from the US), so it was a really interesting discovery, too. You know me, I love books dealing with school and pressure. Our main character really wants to be the perfect, straight A, Harvard and every Ivy-League school material and has worked, with her single mom’s encouragement, towards it her entire life (almost). I really empathized with her struggles as everything goes the wrong way for her and was rooting for her right from the start, too. Her narration, sarcastic, funny, bold, was really good to read. This book also got its share of good side-characters, from the best friend (who is bisexual, yay!) to the group of girls hackers (yay!). Overall, We Regret To Inform You was a fun read, yet dealing with important topics such as the difference between who you are and the face you show to the world, school pressure. I’d definitely recommend it! Thank you to Penguin Random House International for the e-ARC of this book. This did not, in any way, influenced my thoughts and rating. My Blog - Drizzle & Hurricane Books - Twitter

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC from Netgalley Mischa attends a prestigious private school near D.C., at great personal cost to her single mother. Mischa has done everything she is supposed to do, keeping up her grades, doing well on tests, and getting good letters of recommendation from her teachers. When college acceptance day rolls around, however, things go badly, and in the end, Mischa doesn't even get accepted by her fall back school. Her friend Nate is very supportive and tries to help, but Mischa doesn't want to d E ARC from Netgalley Mischa attends a prestigious private school near D.C., at great personal cost to her single mother. Mischa has done everything she is supposed to do, keeping up her grades, doing well on tests, and getting good letters of recommendation from her teachers. When college acceptance day rolls around, however, things go badly, and in the end, Mischa doesn't even get accepted by her fall back school. Her friend Nate is very supportive and tries to help, but Mischa doesn't want to disappoint her mother, so claims that she got into Paul Revere, just so she doesn't have to tell her. She's so upset that she even visits Revere and talks to an admissions officer, and when she is there, catches a glimpse of her transcript-- which has Ds on it! Since the lowest grade she ever got was an A-, in gym, Mischa starts to investigate. A group of girls in her school who like to dabble in hacking help her out, and they soon uncover (after much fun sleuthing!) a grade changing ring that rewards the students whose parents have donated a lot of money to the school and that penalizes students who do very well but are poor. Even though this ring affects Nate, with whom she has an increasingly close relationship, Mischa manages to team up with her arch nemesis to put things to right. Strengths: This is blissfully middle grade appropriate, which I appreciated. Mischa is a great character who is focused and really wants to make her mother happy by being successful. Her mother, who has pushed her a bit, is completely understanding when she thinks Mischa has gotten into only Paul Revere. The romance with Nate is great, and the peek into the lives of the wealthy and privileged is fun. The hacking and spying is right up there with Carter's Gallagher Girls, but more realistic. I liked it so much that I am slightly sad I don't work in a high school so I could hand it to every reader who comes into the library. (But not really, because I love middle school!) Weaknesses: There is some borderline illegal activity, but it's essential for taking down the powers that are unfairly changing grades. There is also just a tiny bit of kissing, although to throw off a principal from finding out they had broken into the school to get records, one of the girls takes off her shirt, and there is also an Instagram account that is hacked and made to look like a girl is taking heroin. What I really think: This was so much fun, both the grade changing ring and the romance, and I really enjoyed it. I just don't think middle school students in my area will care all that much. I would definitely buy this for any high school library.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lonestarreader

    Spoilers, I guess. DNF. I was enjoying this novel about a young girl who goes to an expensive prep school in order to hopefully get into an Ivy League college. She reminded me a bit of Rory Gilmore from Gilmore Girls so I was interested to see what she would do when she is rejected from every school she applied to, including her safety school that virtually anyone can get into. She believes her SAT scores, grades, letters of rec, and extracurriculars should have made her a shoo in for any of her Spoilers, I guess. DNF. I was enjoying this novel about a young girl who goes to an expensive prep school in order to hopefully get into an Ivy League college. She reminded me a bit of Rory Gilmore from Gilmore Girls so I was interested to see what she would do when she is rejected from every school she applied to, including her safety school that virtually anyone can get into. She believes her SAT scores, grades, letters of rec, and extracurriculars should have made her a shoo in for any of her choices, but especially for her safety school; however, she did not get accepted to any of them. I was hoping for a book about what to do when your dreams are crushed and where college may not be the only option to make it in the world, but instead around page 100 the book took a turn toward a mystery. Who wanted to ruin Mischa's life and why? I was even fine with this, but what made me put the book down was when Mischa's friends turned out to be hackers and they all broke into the school in order to hack into the records. Far-fetched and ridiculous for a contemporary.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Chou

    The college admission process is brutal, but A.E. Kaplan’s WE REGRET TO INFORM YOU manages to make what is essentially a roll of the dice for even 4.0 students into a seriously funny and thought-provoking novel, perfect for teens and their anxiety-riddled parents. Mischa has the top grades, the test scores, the varied extracurriculars, and a scholarship at fancy Blanchard Prep. Maybe she won’t get in everywhere, but she should get in somewhere, right? Wrong. When even her not-quite-mediocre safe The college admission process is brutal, but A.E. Kaplan’s WE REGRET TO INFORM YOU manages to make what is essentially a roll of the dice for even 4.0 students into a seriously funny and thought-provoking novel, perfect for teens and their anxiety-riddled parents. Mischa has the top grades, the test scores, the varied extracurriculars, and a scholarship at fancy Blanchard Prep. Maybe she won’t get in everywhere, but she should get in somewhere, right? Wrong. When even her not-quite-mediocre safety school rejects her and the school’s college guidance counselor suddenly vanishes, Mischa hunts for an explanation. Along the way she uncovers a conspiracy involving both the guy she loves (who just might love her back) and her worst enemy (whose burning desire to attend Harvard provides Mischa with exactly the tools she needs.) My favorite characters are the Ophelia Syndicate, a group of girl hackers who have Mischa’s back as she struggles to figure out which direction her life will take now that all her expectations are flipped upside-down and college is no longer a given. A page-turner of a novel that’s also a much needed commentary on the zany process of getting into college.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Grade: B+ An e-galley was provided by Random House via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: We Regret to Inform You has been kind of slipping under the radar. Not a lot of bloggers have talked about it, and it's not getting a lot of hype, like some other August titles. And I'm surprised. It was nice to go into the story, not knowing what to expect, but also it was terrifying. Yet, there was nothing to be scared of. WRtIY has a good voice. Mischa is a strong n Grade: B+ An e-galley was provided by Random House via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: We Regret to Inform You has been kind of slipping under the radar. Not a lot of bloggers have talked about it, and it's not getting a lot of hype, like some other August titles. And I'm surprised. It was nice to go into the story, not knowing what to expect, but also it was terrifying. Yet, there was nothing to be scared of. WRtIY has a good voice. Mischa is a strong narrator who kept me interested from the get-go. She's mature but still teenager-y. (For example, she doesn't tell her mom about her grades being hacked for a very long time.) Also, can I just say I shipped her and Nate from the get-go? There were never any serious communication issues between them, and yeah, they have a fight at one point, but both apologize the next day and move past it. The Ophelia Syndicate is a well-rounded group of girls, although some of their background details still felt too surface to me. (Also, I really wish their group's name had been talked about in more than one scene.) Meredith Dorsay was a layered character, which I appreciated. She felt gray in good ways; there was no excuse for how she treated Mischa, but she also helped do the right thing at the end (although mostly for selfish reasons). The plot moved along at a good speed. There were several points where I was sad to have to put the book down and go to work or sleep. The beginning takes a couple chapters, but then it really gets going. Content warnings: Making out. It's suggested at one point that a teacher has relationships with two different students. The Verdict: I'm happy to inform you that this book was a hit.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Moriah Conant

    Wow, this is a great book!! 1. College rejection EMAILS suck. I can relate. And an email feels even worse than a letter because it seems like they couldn’t even be bothered to buy a stamp. Ugh, it’s painful. 2. “We Regret to Inform” pleasantly surprised me as somewhat of a mystery book. Mischa and her friends/classmates try to unravel how she was rejected from 7 schools and the story is very engaging. Read “We Regret to Inform You”!! I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mckinlay

    *i received an early review copy from netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* I went into this book knowing very little about it because I've literally heard no one talk about it, so i had zero expectations and I LOVED IT! I was interested in the story right away. The MC is driven and unapologetic about it. I absolutely ADORED her love interest who is bisexual and NOT PROBLEMATIC, GOD BLESS US EVERYONE! I ship them SO HARD! There's a female gang of hackers and 2 of them are *i received an early review copy from netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* I went into this book knowing very little about it because I've literally heard no one talk about it, so i had zero expectations and I LOVED IT! I was interested in the story right away. The MC is driven and unapologetic about it. I absolutely ADORED her love interest who is bisexual and NOT PROBLEMATIC, GOD BLESS US EVERYONE! I ship them SO HARD! There's a female gang of hackers and 2 of them are in a relationship. It's everything! This book is funny, and enthralling, and I can't recommend it enough.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Camryn

    this was so wild and I loved it

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sophie_The_Jedi_Knight

    *3.5 An enjoyable highly unrealistic book. Requires a high suspension of disbelief but was a fun a ride. Full review to come.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bruin Bookworm

    I loved it! Witty and a great mystery :)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    **I received this as an egalley from the publisher through Edelweiss in return for an honest review.** Okay, so I honestly didn't think I was going to be in the mood to read this when I started it, but from the first chapter onward I was hooked. The writing was fast, smooth and completely immersing, pulling me in and not letting go for one second. The characters are diverse and full of life, and the plot was both heartaching and beautiful. This book is one of those books that everyone can relate **I received this as an egalley from the publisher through Edelweiss in return for an honest review.** Okay, so I honestly didn't think I was going to be in the mood to read this when I started it, but from the first chapter onward I was hooked. The writing was fast, smooth and completely immersing, pulling me in and not letting go for one second. The characters are diverse and full of life, and the plot was both heartaching and beautiful. This book is one of those books that everyone can relate to in some way, and is unflinchingly real in everything it portrays. Right off the bat, the story dragged me in, making me feel sympathetic pain for Mischa as one by one all of her dreams are dashed with every rejection letter she receives from the colleges to which she applied. The pace of the story was absolutely perfect, giving me all the suspense and threat of growing stakes as Mischa and the Ophelia Syndicate race to uncover the mystery behind her botched college admissions. There was some time though where Mischa gave up on the chase a bit, and while it was interesting to see herself focus on herself more during this period, I also felt like it was a strange pause to have in the mystery aspect of the novel. Other than that, though, it was an excellent balance of intrigue and the daily woes of being a teenager on the cusp of adulthood. I really loved the characters in this book. They all had distinct personalities, and felt real in the way they were portrayed. Mischa makes mistakes and some bad judgment calls, but is still kind and caring towards others and worries constantly about getting in trouble. Nate is willing to do what it right for him, despite what other expect. Meredith, Mischa's academic rival, is unfailingly mean and doesn't care what other people think of her. And the Ophelias - Bebe, Shira, and Emily - are all so extremely interesting in their individual ways, really making a statement about how people are perceived versus what they are actually like. Mischa, the narrator, is a wonderful protagonist, because she is easy to sympathize with but also isn't perfect. I felt such a connection to her, because I too was an overachiever in high school (although not to the same extent) and had some of the same existential crisis moments that she does throughout the book (sadly mine have come later in life and I wish I had had them sooner to realize what I was missing out on). I also loved Mischa's relationships with those around her, especially Nate and her mother, because although they seem perfect and great on the outlook, as the story progresses it becomes clear that they aren't perfect - there are fights and miscommunications and sometimes lies, but then there is also reconcilliation and forgiveness and always love. And while I didn't always agree with the way she handled some things, it was easy to step back from the page and understand why she would act that way. I think the strongest part of this book is just the message (which it should be), which, for me, is about taking a moment to step away from things and look at the bigger picture. I, too, spent my entire high school career studying and doing homework and getting good grades and being good in basically every subject, but now that I'm out of high school and out of college, I feel like I forgot to take the time to discover what it was exactly that I loved to do. This book is about that, and it's about the pressure students have these days to achieve greatly and strive to be the best, because it's a dog-eat-dog world and no one wants to make room for the younger generations anymore, so they have to fight their way in. It's also about friendships and parent-child relationships, and understanding yourself and those around you. This was a great read that started off heartbreaking, turned happy and gave me laughs, kept me on the edge of the seat to find out the answers to the mystery, and brought tears to my eyes everytime I recognized a part of myself on the page. Part of me feels like this is a book I could have used earlier in my life - maybe in high school, maybe even earlier, or maybe in college - but the other part of me wonders if I would have connected with it as much if I had read it then as opposed to now. It ended up being a narrative that meant so much to me, not because of the horrible feeling of being a failure that Mischa had to endure, but because of the realizations about herself that came about by the whole fiasco. 4.75 stars

  19. 5 out of 5

    Heather (Heather Hearts Books) Kilpatrick

    This book is incredibly smart and shockingly witty. Mischa's narrative is funny and quick. If you loved the quick repartee of Gilmore Girls, you'll love this book. It moves fast and Mischa is a very worthy narrative. The mystery element is also really entertaining. It's basically a whodunnit and the ultimate culprit was NEVER on my list of suspects. If you enjoyed One of Us is Lying, you'll really enjoy We Regret to Inform You. It's a quick moving mystery that you can't put down, and though it d This book is incredibly smart and shockingly witty. Mischa's narrative is funny and quick. If you loved the quick repartee of Gilmore Girls, you'll love this book. It moves fast and Mischa is a very worthy narrative. The mystery element is also really entertaining. It's basically a whodunnit and the ultimate culprit was NEVER on my list of suspects. If you enjoyed One of Us is Lying, you'll really enjoy We Regret to Inform You. It's a quick moving mystery that you can't put down, and though it doesn't involve murder, it also doesn't lack an element of excitement. I also loved that this is a very diverse book. Mischa works with the Ophelia Syndicate to try and crack the case of who tanked her college chances, and the Ophelias are a group of super computer whizzes, professional level coders, and hackers. This is so incredibly important! We need more women who code and who are into the different computer sciences and engineering. And that they've learned and taught themselves is really, really inspiring. The LGBTQ+ community is also represented here -- Nate himself is bisexual and when Mischa met him and first developed a crush on him, she learned her had a boyfriend, so she stifled those feelings away. I gave this book 5 HEARTS! I loved it and I read it in about six hours. I absolutely couldn't put it down. My mom was watching me devour it all day long! Things start to get spoilery here -- you've been warned! So here's the nitty gritty of how it all happened ... The title of the book was obviously a giveaway as to how things would go for Mischa. And the mystery element of it was really interesting to me. Sure enough, as acceptance day is on the horizon, Mischa doesn't even get into the back-up school she absolutely loathes. And she cannot for the life of her figure out why she didn't get in ANYWHERE, especially Georgetown, which is where she'd dreamed of going for years. The book makes several references to Shakespearean literature, especially when it comes to the Ophelia Syndicate, made up of Emily, Shira, and Beth, three girls who are super hackers and know their way around the school's administrations servers and hard drives pretty well. Since everything for college applications is now done digitally, right down to transcripts and recommendation letters, they're sure they can pick up the trail that left Mischa college-less. Soon, Mischa is in the thick of it with them, and so is Nate, her best friend and someone who she might just be in love with, but hasn't really had the time to play out those feelings in her head or her heart, much less with Nate himself. Mischa's positive that her arch-rival, Meredith, who has been obsessed with one-upping her (but never actually successful in doing it) is behind it. She got into Harvard, Princeton, and Yale. But what they end up discovering is something none of them -- including Meredith -- could've prepared for. When it turns out the school has been orchestrating a sort of ring of miseducation amongst the prospective students and the colleges they applied to, they are shocked. Essentially, the school is giving inflated transcripts and recommendations to those students who donate more (like Meredith and Nate) and giving dirty transcripts and accusing them of false crimes in their recommendations to those students whose families give less (like Mischa and another student who donate less and are on scholarships). Even knowing that this will effect his fate at Emory, his dream school, Nate, the Ophelias, Mischa, and surprisingly, Meredith, band together to catch the headmaster in the act. The only downside is that Meredith finagles the situation to make sure she loses nothing and is championed as a the poster child for solving the mystery and obtaining proof of the crime, even though she theoretically had to some acceptances to lose. That frustrated me. But I do love a book where the protagonist and antagonist have to work together for a common goal. Despite getting into her dream school, Mischa and Nate decide to take a gap year (another thing I think I could've benefited from, but was not nearly as trendy as it is now) and road trip all over the country before settling down into their chosen colleges, having realized that yes, they ARE in love with each other. I loved that they didn't realize they were in love 'til near the end of the book, but also that it didn't weigh down the plot. It wasn't something they were consistently focusing on. The romance was really not a major plot line at all, just something affirmed at just the right time in the novel. This book is everything a YA contemporary novel with a mysterious twist should be, from beginning to end, and I can't stress enough how fun and fast the plot moves. (www.heatherheartsbooks.com)

  20. 5 out of 5

    FriedClam

    This was a great book. And it would make a great movie. And I've already written the script. The first win for this book is the spoofing of classic tropes (though I'm not sure if that was the intention or not). Mainly the classic super-cool-team-of-dudes-and-one-female-love-interest thing (think Mission Impossible or Avengers). Because here we have a wonderfully flawed female main character, a snarky band of "official STEM club" female hackers, and the one cute guy for the main character to fall This was a great book. And it would make a great movie. And I've already written the script. The first win for this book is the spoofing of classic tropes (though I'm not sure if that was the intention or not). Mainly the classic super-cool-team-of-dudes-and-one-female-love-interest thing (think Mission Impossible or Avengers). Because here we have a wonderfully flawed female main character, a snarky band of "official STEM club" female hackers, and the one cute guy for the main character to fall in love with. Yes. Yes to all. A problem I have with a lot of books, especially YA, is that I can always see the twists coming. (Because they're predictable.) And that doesn't always make the book bad, necessarily, but it does take a bit of the edge off. With this book, however? Not at all. It got me so deep in that I was always right on board with the main narrative--especially because of the way Ariel Kaplan tricks you into thinking you've got it figured out. Every time--I kid you not--Mischa thought one thing, I was on board. I could connect the dots, see just how perfectly it would fit into the story. And then it turned out--whoops--it was this other guy. Okay, I can see that...oh wait now it's this guy. And that might be because I was reading it like a YA and not a hardcore mystery (or perhaps the hour at which I sit and read), but it was a nice change from the usual nonetheless. And it has an ending! Yes! Please! No drop-off nonesense, no inconclusive openings, no threads dangling. An actual ending. Thank you. I needed this. It has everything a good movie book needs; well-rounded characters, strong female leads, a cute relationship, suspense, twists, hacking, and a dare-I-say-epic interogation/negotiation/confrontation between the main character (a student) and the main antagonist (the nice principal that nobody suspected) that I wasn't aware I needed until I read it and am totally obsessed with. In short, when you see this on the big screen in ten years, you know who to thank. (Me.) The script is finalized, and I've got a good draft of the cast list going (but Emily is mine and nobody can have her). You'll want to buy tickets way in advance, 'cause it'll be a box office hit. Trust me. Oh yeah, and you should read this book. That too. (view spoiler)[P.S. I totally ship Bebe and Shira because they are so cute thanks bye (hide spoiler)]

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    I received a copy of this book thanks to Netgalley and Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. "I was low enough now to see cars on the highway, with little tiny people inside them, driving to and fro, like little ants move things around. I realized that I, too, am a tiny ant. I live on this marble-shaped planet with seven billion other ants, and every one of us is convinced that our problems, our lives, are somehow eternal and insurm I received a copy of this book thanks to Netgalley and Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. "I was low enough now to see cars on the highway, with little tiny people inside them, driving to and fro, like little ants move things around. I realized that I, too, am a tiny ant. I live on this marble-shaped planet with seven billion other ants, and every one of us is convinced that our problems, our lives, are somehow eternal and insurmountable, but look! You go up a mile or two, you look out at the horizon, and you can see what all our struggles are worth. They have exactly as much meaning as we give them, and not one bit more." Going into this book I honestly thought that it was just going to be about self discovery, and don't get me wrong there isn't anything wrong with books like that, but they just aren't for me. So needless to say I didn't have high hopes for it, nothing more than 2.5-3 stars. I am so happy to say that this book shattered my expectations. Mischa applies to 7 different colleges, they run the gamut, from reach schools to safety "everyone gets in" schools. Email by email she gets rejected and her world falls down around her. Her mother slaved and scraped, and went into debt to get Mischa into an "elite" high school to ensure that Mischa received the best education possible so that Mischa would never have to struggle like she did. But at least Mischa has her safety school, Paul Revere, right? Wrong. She was rejected from there as well! Mischa recruits friends and strangers alike to help her figure out where things went so terribly wrong. I did not expect the direction this book took, and I lived for it. I couldn't stop reading it, I was glued to my kindle until I could confirm things were rectified. I will say that Mischa as a character ABSOLUTELY infuriated me. I wanted to reach into the book and slap her silly. Not once did she bother to inform her mother of what was going on, even when things go REALLY bad. I understand that she was scared of being a disappointment to her mother, but lying is never the way to go. Lies always get unearthed. 4.5 Stars

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lizz Axnick

    I do not envy today's high schoolers and the immense pressure upon them to compete for spots in all types of college. I went through that to get into nursing school and it was intense. I cannot imagine having to fill my platter in high school with tons of extracurriculars that I don't care about to pad my resume. This book is a work of fiction, although I wonder if there may be an element of truth somewhere, in the dark reaches of society where no one talks about it. It is about a girl, Mischa, I do not envy today's high schoolers and the immense pressure upon them to compete for spots in all types of college. I went through that to get into nursing school and it was intense. I cannot imagine having to fill my platter in high school with tons of extracurriculars that I don't care about to pad my resume. This book is a work of fiction, although I wonder if there may be an element of truth somewhere, in the dark reaches of society where no one talks about it. It is about a girl, Mischa, who has spent her whole life working her fanny off to get into a good college. Her mother hemorrhages money for her to go to a fancy private school. She spends all her free time studying or in the aforementioned clubs to add to her resume. And then everything falls apart. She doesn't get into any of the 7 schools she has applied to, despite being a top student with high SAT and AP scores. The rug has been pulled out from under her and she doesn't know what to do about it. With the help of a group of elite hackers, she finds out her transcript has been changed and her faculty letters of recommendation have been falsified. Here is the stupid thing: The faculty letters of recommendation are confidential. Why is that? Sure it adds to the mystery of the story but when I got mine in high school I just asked the teachers and they wrote me the letter and handed it to me to send in with my applications. There was no secrecy and I got to see everything in the letters. If that really is a thing where you can't see what people wrote, then I wouldn't want them potentially "recommending me" without knowing what they said. I admit I could not put this book down. I went to a hoity toity high school for the first three years, although it wasn't private and most of the kids that went to my school were rich. It made it easy to empathize with Mischa in this regard. I am not sure I would recommend this book to anyone under college-age just because the possibility of truth might scare the pants off them and I don't want anyone discouraged about going to college. I very much enjoyed the story and I will probably read it again in the future.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Essence

    Synopsis: Mischa Abramavicius works harder than anyone at her prestigious prep school. While her peers drive BMWs and are descendants of historically wealthy families of power, she is at Blanchard Prep on scholarship. Finally, the day comes for her college acceptance letters to begin rolling in. Except she finds that she has been - despite her extracurriculars, stunning SAT, and 3.9 GPA - rejected. from all of them. Even the safety school with a near 80% admissions rate. Suspecting foul play, Mi Synopsis: Mischa Abramavicius works harder than anyone at her prestigious prep school. While her peers drive BMWs and are descendants of historically wealthy families of power, she is at Blanchard Prep on scholarship. Finally, the day comes for her college acceptance letters to begin rolling in. Except she finds that she has been - despite her extracurriculars, stunning SAT, and 3.9 GPA - rejected. from all of them. Even the safety school with a near 80% admissions rate. Suspecting foul play, Mischa teams up with her school's hacker girl-group known as the Ophelia Syndicate and her charming bisexual best friend Nate to uncover the mystery of her rejection letters. Review: We Regret to Inform You was pretty entertaining to read. It didn't take itself too seriously and ned a rather informal writing style. Mischa flounders after her college rejections - she's the daughter of a hardworking immigrant grandmother and sees her entry into college as a way of honoring her grandmother and mothers' struggle. As she grapples with her loss of identity, she struggles with unrequited love for her best friend. The dialogue for the book was freakishly entertaining with rather funny characters - especially Nate, who adds a great deal of likability to the story with his charm and wit. The friendship and loyalty that exists between him and Mischa is heartwarming and made me feel more endeared to her character. Furthermore, the prep school mystery/rejection letter mystery was complex and layered. The true villain in this story wasn't easily guessable which made the story that much better. While the story has a good deal of conflict - there's plenty of hostility between Mischa and Meredith, an academic rival who can't accept Mischa's superior grades - it lacks in several areas. Kaplan never attempts to provide descriptions for her characters and Mischa is written as having no flaws to make her character a complex one. Still, the school provides EXCELLENT commentary on how hyper-academia hurts our children's emotional and mental health. It illustrates the negative ways immigrants are treated and perceived, and also had an ending that wasn't picture-perfect.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Meredith Engel

    I received a fee ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review through Netgalley. Mischa is a high school senior who lives every overachievers worst nightmare - she finds out that she did not get into any colleges. As an educator who works with high schoolers and as a person who was a very intense high schooler this idea was appealing to me. Immediately I wanted to know why did this happen and how this was all going to play out. Mischa is a great character and it was really nice to see an au I received a fee ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review through Netgalley. Mischa is a high school senior who lives every overachievers worst nightmare - she finds out that she did not get into any colleges. As an educator who works with high schoolers and as a person who was a very intense high schooler this idea was appealing to me. Immediately I wanted to know why did this happen and how this was all going to play out. Mischa is a great character and it was really nice to see an author explore the other side of focusing so hard on college admissions. Mischa has lost an important part of her identity in trying to create the perfect application. While overall I enjoyed the book, there were a few places where it was a little off for me. The first was the tone, the book moved back and forth from sort of quirky who dunnit to romance to more "literary" YA. The other issue I had with the books was how it deals with the class conflict that is at the heart of the story. There are some deep, deep issues with privilege and power and these issues are just kind of used to end the book and not dealt with in any real way. Finally, I think that this book pushed suspension of disbelief just a tad. Would a straight A, all of the extra curriculars, nearly perfect SAT score student really not tell the adults in her life that she had not gotten into any colleges? Would they really not believe that something was wrong when she did not even get into her safety school? This was difficult for me to go along with as I read this book. I know that this is not always reality, but I really hope my students believe that most adults are in their corner when they encounter challenges that seem beyond their control

  25. 4 out of 5

    miss.mesmerized mesmerized

    Mischa Abramavicious is the perfect student: she has all the grades it needs to get into the best colleges, her list of extracurricular activities is impressive and her single-parent mom will be proud of her. But on Admission Day, she only gets rejections. None of the schools has admitted her, not even the local safety college. But how come? Mischa doesn’t dare to tell her mother but starts investigating instead. Together of the Ophelia Club, a bunch of tech-wise girls of her school, and her fri Mischa Abramavicious is the perfect student: she has all the grades it needs to get into the best colleges, her list of extracurricular activities is impressive and her single-parent mom will be proud of her. But on Admission Day, she only gets rejections. None of the schools has admitted her, not even the local safety college. But how come? Mischa doesn’t dare to tell her mother but starts investigating instead. Together of the Ophelia Club, a bunch of tech-wise girls of her school, and her friend Nate, they discover that marks and letter of recommendation have been changed – but why, and especially: be whom? “We Regret to Inform You” is a well-written novel about today’s teenagers and the pressure they are under. Only when the whole world falls apart for Mischa does she realize that she actually has no hobbies, not even an interest but that she has spent the last for years only working for her résumé and to fulfil her mother’s expectations. The later, too, also put much in her daughter’s future, invested money she didn’t have to get her into an expensive private school which promised the best starting point for an Ivy League University. I really liked Ariel Kaplan’s style of writing. Even though a major catastrophe is happening to the protagonist, the novel is not really depressing but quite entertaining since there are many comic situations and ironic dialogues. The novel concentrates on the positive side which I liked a lot, Mischa doesn’t give up, but her focus shifts and she finally gets to understand herself better. She makes the best of it and fights for her rights – but not at the expense of everything else. So, it still is a young adult novel even though there are some underlying very serious issues.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Although Mischa Abramovicius attends a highly-competitive private high school, there is little doubt that she's on her way to one of the top universities in the country. After all, this smart and involved senior has the grades, the SAT scores, the extracurricular activities, and even the reference letters that should practically guarantee her acceptance in whatever school she wishes to attend. But while her peers are rejoicing in their letters of acceptance, Mischa is shocked to find only reject Although Mischa Abramovicius attends a highly-competitive private high school, there is little doubt that she's on her way to one of the top universities in the country. After all, this smart and involved senior has the grades, the SAT scores, the extracurricular activities, and even the reference letters that should practically guarantee her acceptance in whatever school she wishes to attend. But while her peers are rejoicing in their letters of acceptance, Mischa is shocked to find only rejection letters from her chosen colleges, even from the local one that was beneath her consideration. What could have gone wrong? With help from some tech-savvy classmates and her best friend Nate, on whom she has a crush, Mischa realizes that someone has changed her transcripts and her recommendation letters. But as things turn out, what has happened to her is nothing new, and the plot goes much deeper than she and her friends ever imagined. While I liked trying to figure out how things went so wrong for this senior and how she and her mother try to deal with their disappointment, what was most interesting to me here was how Mischa starts reinventing herself, realizing that perhaps there is much more to her than just a smart girl with good grades. As she pulls away from some of the clubs and activities in which she has been involved, not because of interest but because of how that involvement would look on her applications, Mischa begins to discover herself. This book is perfect for any high schooler caught on that upwardly bound treadmill to academic success or even for adults who no longer follow their hearts, instead choosing to follow the money or to do what's expected of them. Perhaps there is more to life than that, as Mischa comes to realize.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Received advanced reader copy from publisher via Baker & Taylor book supplier Mischa is the student that every teacher loves: excellent grades, terrific test scores, awesome list of extracurriculars. Her college applications read like shoe-ins. Except she isn’t. She not only gets rejected by her Ivy League choices but by her safety school as well. This was why Mischa & her mother had struggled and scrapped by in order to pay the hefty Blanchard Academy tuition for Mischa’s high school Received advanced reader copy from publisher via Baker & Taylor book supplier Mischa is the student that every teacher loves: excellent grades, terrific test scores, awesome list of extracurriculars. Her college applications read like shoe-ins. Except she isn’t. She not only gets rejected by her Ivy League choices but by her safety school as well. This was why Mischa & her mother had struggled and scrapped by in order to pay the hefty Blanchard Academy tuition for Mischa’s high school years. But, as Mischa struggles to try to come to turns with her future, she also asks “How did this happen?” If I was ever glad that my college application days are behind me, this novel underscored exactly how glad I really am. Goodness, the anxiety I felt when Mischa received her rejections letters felt like I was getting them for myself! When an author succeeds in making a far-from-college-years reader feel that anxiety like it is happening right now that is a testament to talent. This was a story with a strong cast of secondary characters. As likeable as Mischa was, Nate, Emily, Bebe, & Shira added so, so much to the story. Even make-my-skin-crawl Meredith was perfection and rounded out the cast wonderfully. I would say to those in the thralls of college admissions: read this with caution. You may find yourself with cold sweats and panic attacks as you read of Mischa’s misfortune. But there is much to be learned from Mischa’s look at herself, her life, and her focus after she is forced to look at other options because college is no longer one.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Robb

    Warning: There may be Spoilers Your mom works hard and sacrifices to send you to a private school so that you can get into a good college. You work hard in school to get good grades, join clubs to pad your extracurriculars, and basically do everything you're asked to do--yet you get accepted to 0 of your 7 schools. That's what happens to Mischa. And then she finds out that her transcript and recommendation letters were tampered with. To be fair to Mischa, she does try to tell someone at the school Warning: There may be Spoilers Your mom works hard and sacrifices to send you to a private school so that you can get into a good college. You work hard in school to get good grades, join clubs to pad your extracurriculars, and basically do everything you're asked to do--yet you get accepted to 0 of your 7 schools. That's what happens to Mischa. And then she finds out that her transcript and recommendation letters were tampered with. To be fair to Mischa, she does try to tell someone at the school (someone we later finds out is fired for not following directions) but she doesn't tell her mother or any other adults. She tells her friend Nate who gets her involved with the Ophelias. And again, instead of telling an adult, they go off investigating on their own. (And of course, they discover Blanchard's dirty little secret. Money makes the world go 'round.) Mischa acts like there are no other college choices beyond the 7 that she picked to apply to. Is it disappointing to not get into any colleges of your choice? Sure it is! Especially when many of your friends do get in to their choices. But there are many more choices out there. I can somewhat understand Mischa not wanting to apply elsewhere since she believes they'll get the same transcript and letters that the other 7 colleges got. (Something Marlowe seems to indicate near the end.) But I know there are colleges out there that will take just about anyone. I don't quite understand who hacked Mischa's instagram account or why.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    We Regret to Inform by Ariel Kaplan is a book about friendship and learning to find yourself. I would recommend this book to people who are struggling in high school and preparing to go into college. It is easy to relate your high school experience to this book, and understand the main characters feelings and challenges. This book shows how important friendship truly is, especially during tough times. It makes you realize how much more easy things are to go through with the help and input of oth We Regret to Inform by Ariel Kaplan is a book about friendship and learning to find yourself. I would recommend this book to people who are struggling in high school and preparing to go into college. It is easy to relate your high school experience to this book, and understand the main characters feelings and challenges. This book shows how important friendship truly is, especially during tough times. It makes you realize how much more easy things are to go through with the help and input of others. On page 92 Mischas friends says, “Think about it this way. At any point in your life, you are two people. There's the Mischa everyone else sees. The second one is the one who gets you into college, or not. That's the one who applies for jobs, and mortgages, and gets written about in the paper. Call her Mischa-bot, if you will…” This shows that sometimes you need someone to reassure you and make you think of things from other perspectives. Throughout the book Mischa builds closer relationships with her friends as they work together in a secret club they formed known as ‘The Ophelia Syndicate’ to uncover the mystery of who sabotaged Mishca's college applications. They use different strategies to narrow their suspect list down to the last few people along the way dealing with plot-twists, conflicts and drama. As she uncovers the shocking truth things turn out to a great conclusion. This is a good mind opening story and an interesting mystery while at the same time expressing important topics that have relevance to the real world and our daily lives.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Skye Line

    This book was...okay. It was meh. It existed. Mischa? Naive. Nate? Cute and bisexual, at least that's what we've been told. Caroline? Nonexistent. Jim? Flat. Emily? Shira? Bebe? Interchangeable. Let's face facts, guys: the plot carried this story. The characters were so bland! Mischa had to tell us everything because otherwise we wouldn't know a damn thing about anyone. It was a classic case of telling with little showing. And it was factually incorrect, which, as a high school senior who is curr This book was...okay. It was meh. It existed. Mischa? Naive. Nate? Cute and bisexual, at least that's what we've been told. Caroline? Nonexistent. Jim? Flat. Emily? Shira? Bebe? Interchangeable. Let's face facts, guys: the plot carried this story. The characters were so bland! Mischa had to tell us everything because otherwise we wouldn't know a damn thing about anyone. It was a classic case of telling with little showing. And it was factually incorrect, which, as a high school senior who is currently applying to college, I found infuriating. "College Admissions Day" is actually Ivy Day, the day the eight Ivy League schools (and a few others like NYU) release decisions. You know how they do it? I'll give you a hint: they don't email students randomly during the day, pinging accepted students first and making the waitlisted/rejects sweat in suspense. They release every decision at a set time! In the evening! AIYA! Sorry about that. I hate when YA authors do incomplete research. (view spoiler)[ Also, why the hell did Mischa's mom take her shopping for dorm stuff like ~2 days after she "found out" Paul Revere was the only school her daughter got into? Most people wait until at least after graduation. (hide spoiler)] Other than that, it was fine. The plot was pretty interesting, the mystery was an actual mystery (and not one that you could solve in three seconds), and some parts were really funny, like the incident with her mom's waterproof eyeliner.

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